Present at ABRCMS

Present at ABRCMS (8)

ePoster Presentation Session

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The ABRCMS 2020 ePoster Presentation Session will provide an opportunity for those who cannot attend ABRCMS 2020 in San Antonio, Texas on November 11-14 to present their research on a virtual platform through ABRCMS Online. The ePoster Presentation Session will take place asynchronously December 2-4. Due to the financial hardships caused by COVID-19, in 2020 registration for the ePoster Presentation Session will be free.

Check the website regularly for updates.

Important Dates for ePosters and In-Person

  • Sept. 11: Abstract Submission Deadline (both)
  • Sept. 17-20: Abstract Review (both)
  • Sept. 28: Abstract Notifications Sent
  • Sept. 30: Accept/Withdraw Abstract Deadline (in-person poster)
  • Oct. 15: Accept/Withdraw Deadline (ePoster)
  • Nov. 11–14: ABRCMS 2020 in San Antonio, Texas (in-person poster)
  • Nov. 20: Deadline to Upload Presentation (ePoster)
  • Dec 2–4: ePoster Presentation Session (ePoster)

Submitting your abstract and confirming your participation 

Confirm your eligibility. 

To submit an abstract, you must satisfy the following two criteria:

  1. As of Nov. 11, 2020, you must be currently enrolled as one of the following:
    1. Community college student
      1. Must have completed at least 30 credit hours
    2. Undergraduate sophomore, junior, or senior
    3. Postbaccalaureate student
      1. Must be enrolled in a formalized program
      2. Program Director/Research Advisor must submit confirmation of education level*
    4. Terminal level master's student
      1. Program Director/Research Advisor must submit confirmation of education level*
  2. Have conducted research, used experimental methods and developed results in one of the 12 ABRCMS scientific disciplines

Those who present in-person at ABRCMS 2020 on Nov. 11-14 in San Antonio, TX are not eligible to present during the ePoster Presentation Session.

Please note:

  • Your eligibility is based on your enrolled education level as of Nov. 11, 2020 and NOT your education level when you conducted your research or when you submitted your abstract
  • Doctoral-level graduate students, including individuals enrolled in professional degree programs (i.e. DVM, PharmD, DMD), are ineligible to present

*On Sept. 15 Program Directors/Advisors of postbac and master’s students will be sent an email containing a form to complete and a link to upload the form. The form will serve as confirmation of the student's education level. All forms must be submitted by Sept. 17. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that all components were received.

Review the abstract components and guidelines. 

The abstract components and guidelines are the same for both ePoster and poster abstracts.

Accepted abstracts must contain:

  • At least two authors in the author block
  • Hypothesis or statement about the problem under investigation
  • Statement of the experimental methods/methodology used
  • Essential results provided in summary form (even if preliminary)
  • Conclusion

Abstracts missing any of the items above will be rejected. In addition, abstracts must be clearly written and free of multiple errors.

Learn how to write a competitive abstract

Abstract Rules:

  • Only one student, the individual listed first in the author block, can present the abstract
  • You must obtain permission from your research mentors, co-authors, and program directors before submitting an abstract. Research mentors, co-authors, and program directors will receive a copy of the notification e-mail by Sept. 28, 2020 indicating the status of the abstract
  • Only one abstract submission per student is acceptable. If you are listed as the presenting author on more than one abstract, all abstracts associated with you will be automatically rejected
  • If you are unsure of whether to submit an abstract for an ePoster or poster presentation, submit an abstract for the in-person conference. If your abstract is accepted, you will be given the opportunity to switch to an ePoster presentation. However, because in-person poster presentations will be judged, you will NOT be allowed to switch from an ePoster presentation to an in-person presentation
  • If you are working in the same lab as another abstract submitter, you must independently submit original abstracts. Identical abstracts submitted by different students will be automatically rejected
  • Abstracts must be written by you and reviewed/edited by the mentor. Mentors should not write the abstract
  • Citations, tables and keywords are not allowed in the abstract text and will be removed
  • The character limit of the abstract is 2,500 (not including spaces)
  • Work must be proofread prior to submission. ABRCMS staff will not edit abstracts nor add co-authors after the abstract submission deadline
  • No late submissions will be accepted

Additional Resources:

Attend the "Writing a Compelling Abstract" webinar series. 

Understand how ABRCMS reviewers will review your abstract and the elements of successful abstract submissions when you attend this ABRCMS Online series.

June 18 & 19
Writing a Compelling Abstract

July 31 & Aug. 5
Preparing the ABRCMS Abstract: Communicating Your Science

All abstract submitters are strongly encouraged to attend one of these sessions. If you cannot attend the live webinars, recordings will be available.

Submit your abstract by 11:59 pm PDT Sept. 11, 2020. 

Submit your abstract via the ABRCMS Abstract Portal. For details on using the site and how abstracts are selected, click here.

ePoster abstracts and poster abstracts for the in-person conference will be reviewed at the same time using the same review process and criteria.

You will be notified by Sept. 28, 2020 if your abstract is accepted. 

All abstract authors, including the research advisor listed on your abstract, will receive notice of whether or not your abstract was accepted.

If your abstract is accepted, confirm status by Oct. 15, 2020. 

You MUST accept the invitation to present your abstract by Oct. 15 in order to confirm your participation in the ePoster Presentation Session.

After you have accepted the invitation to present

Review the presentation policies and guidelines 

Additional information to come.

Upload your ePoster & audio file to the ePoster platform by Nov. 20.

All files must be uploaded by Nov. 20 in order to be assigned scientific and peer commenters. Step-by-step instructions will be emailed to all ePoster presenters on how to properly upload the ePoster and audio file.

During the ePoster Presentation Session on Dec. 2–4

View your live presentation.

Additional information to come.

Review and comment on your assigned peers’ presentations Dec. 2-3.

All ePoster presenters will be required to view and comment on assigned peers’ presentations.

  • ABRCMS will assign specific presentations from your discipline
  • You’ll review and comment on the presentations any time during Dec. 2-3
  • You’re encouraged to review and comment early to give sufficient time for presenters to respond

Respond to questions and comments on your presentation on or before Dec. 4.

You are required to respond to any questions posed by commenters before the ePoster Presentation Session ends on Dec. 4

  • Peers and active researchers will be assigned to review your presentation
  • These individuals will be asked to leave feedback on your presentation through the virtual platform
  • While people are assigned to your presentation, your presentation will not be judged

Q&A

How do I submit an ePoster abstract?

The abstract submission process is the same for submitting an ePoster and in-person poster abstract.

  • You should follow the steps outlined here, clicking on the “New” button for the section “Poster or ePoster”
  • Within the application, there is a question that asks, “Are you submitting an abstract for the in-person ABRCMS conference or the ePoster Presentation Session through ABRCMS Online?” Select the answer “ePoster during the ePoster Presentation Session on Dec. 2-4”
  • This will categorize your abstract as an ePoster
  • Continue to follow all the steps of the application
  • Applications must be submitted by 11:59 pm PST on Sept. 11

What if I am not sure if I can attend ABRCMS 2020 in San Antonio? Should I submit for the ePoster Presentation Session or for an in-person poster session?

If there is a chance that you will present at ABRCMS 2020 in San Antonio on Nov. 11-14, you should submit an abstract for the in-person conference. Only submit an ePoster abstract if you know you cannot present during an in-person poster session. If your abstract is accepted, you will be given the chance to switch your presentation from an in-person poster presentation session to the ePoster Presentation Session. However, due to in-person judging, you cannot switch from an ePoster presentation to an in-person poster presentation.

Will ePosters be judged?

No, ePosters will not be judged. While you will be assigned peers and active researchers to review and comment on your poster, there will be no judging.

 

Are ePosters eligible for awards?

No, ePosters will not be eligible for awards.

Is the ePoster Presentation Session happening asynchronously or at a specific time?

The ePoster Presentation Session will occur asynchronously December 2-4. This means that there are no specific times that the presenters have to be available. Instead, you will be asked to check in on the site throughout the day to respond to any comments or questions left on your presentation.

How do I cite my participation in the ePoster Presentation Session on my CV?

Information to follow.

 

Can I present at ABRCMS 2020 in San Antonio and during the ePoster Presentation Session?

No, you cannot present during both sessions. The ePoster Presentation Session is specifically for students who cannot present in-person at ABRCMS 2020 in San Antonio.

Is there a cost to participate in the ePoster Presentation Session?

Due to the financial hardships caused by COVID-19, in 2020 registration for the ePoster Presentation Session will be free.

 

Who can view the ePoster Presentation Session and how long is it available for viewing?

Anyone who creates a free account in the virtual platform can view the ePoster Presentation Session. ePosters will be available for public viewing Dec. 2-4. After Dec. 4, the ePoster presentations will be removed and no longer accessible.

Please note that abstracts will still be available through the Abstract Database (available in Nov. 2020).

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Scientific Disciplines Represented at ABRCMS

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Transformative discoveries happen when we work across disciplines to solve problems. At ABRCMS, we strongly encourage students in engage in multi-disciplinary research. However, due to the large number of student presentations, all abstracts are required to align with a single scientific discipline and sub-discipline. This allows for the abstract to be assigned to the appropriate reviewers and on-site judges.

1. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

a. Biochemistry - The study of molecules and the cellular processes in which they participate in living organisms.
b. Biomolecules - The study of any organic molecule that is an essential part of a living organism.
c. Chemical Biology - The study of biological processes using chemical strategies, particularly organic synthesis.
d. Genomics - The study of mapping, sequencing, and analyzing the genetic composition of organisms, directed at an understanding of the complete genome and how it is organized and expressed.
e. Proteomics - The study of the protein composition of cells, including protein content, protein modifications, protein-protein interaction, and protein expression during development or changing environmental conditions, generally using high-throughput approaches.
f. Structural Biology - The study of the three-dimensional architectures of biological macromolecules—particularly proteins and nucleic acid—and how their architectures confer their specialized functions.

2. Cancer Biology

a. Cancer Biology - The study of irregularities and uncontrollable growth of individual cells, tissue, or organs in any organisms.

3. Cell Biology

a. Cell Biology - The study of cells; their physiological properties; their structure; the organelles they contain; their interactions with their environment; and their life cycles, division, and death.
b. Molecular Imaging - The study that seeks to exploit an increased and enhanced understanding of the molecular basis of disease through the design of novel imaging probes to specific molecular targets.
c. Plant Biology - The study of plant life involving every aspect of the environment and interactions such that plants may exist in their natural or adapted states.

4. Chemistry

a. Analytical Chemistry - The study of the chemical composition of natural and artificial materials, and the development of tools to elucidate such compositions. 
b. Environmental Chemistry - The study of the chemical and biochemical phenomena that occur in air, soil, and water environments and the effect of human activity on these.
c. Inorganic Chemistry - The study of the properties and behavior of inorganic compounds. 
d. Organic Chemistry - The study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and preparation (by synthesis or by other means) of chemical compounds consisting primarily of carbon and hydrogen, but which may contain any number of other elements.
e. Pharmaceutical Chemistry - The study of the design, synthesis, and development of pharmaceutical drugs. 
f. Physical Chemistry - The study of the application of physics to macroscopic, microscopic, atomic, subatomic, and particulate phenomena in chemical systems within the field of chemistry that traditionally uses the principles, practices, and concepts of thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics, and kinetics.

5. Computational and Systems Biology

a. Bioinformatics - The study of the research, development, or application of computational tools and approaches for expanding the use of biological, medical, behavioral or health data, including those to acquire, store, organize, archive, analyze, or visualize such data.
b. Computational Biology - The study of the development and application of data-analytical and theoretical methods, mathematical modeling and computational simulation techniques to the study of biological, behavioral, and social systems.
c. Computer Sciences - The study of the feasibility, structure, expression, and mechanization of the methodical processes (or algorithms) that underlie the acquisition, processing, storage, and dissemination of - and access to - information.
d. Informatics - The study of the application of computer and statistical techniques to the collection, classification, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of information.
e. Systems Biology - The study of biological systems that involves the complex integration, interactions, and modeling of key elements such as DNA, RNA, proteins, cells, and biochemical reactions with respect to one another.

6. Developmental Biology and Genetics

a. Developmental Biology - The study of the processes by which organisms grow and develop; it encompasses genetics, cell fate specification, differentiation, and morphogenesis as well as the molecular analysis of tissue and organ system anatomy.
b. Evolution and Developmental Biology - The study of the relationship(s) between the evolution and development of an organism or group of organisms; it encompasses genetic, molecular, paleontological, population, and molecular analyses, as well as theoretical (mathematical) and ecological analyses as they relate to organismal development and evolution.
c. Genetics - The study of the inheritance of genes and the traits they cause, as well as the behavior of chromosomes in cell division and reproduction.

7. Engineering, Physics and Mathematics

a. Bioengineering - The study of the application of the principles of engineering to the fields of biology and medicine, as in the development of aids or replacements for defective or missing body organs.
b. Biomedical Engineering - The coordinated and cross-disciplinary study and advancement of Engineering, Biology, and Medicine to foster human health and well-being.
c. Biophysics - The study dealing with the forces that act on living cells of the body, the relationship between the biologic behavior of living structures, the physical influences to which they are subjected, and the physics of vital processes and phenomena.
d. Material Sciences - The study involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering.
e. Mathematics - The study of the measurement, relationships, space configurations, transformations, generalizations, and overall properties of quantities and sets based on numeration and symbols.
f. Nanotechnology - The study of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale, normally 1 to 100 nanometers, and the fabrication of devices with critical dimensions that lie within that range.

8. Immunology

a. Basic Immunology - The study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. It deals with the physiological functioning of the immune system in states of both health and disease; malfunctions of the immune system in immunological disorders; and the physical, chemical, and physiological characteristics of the components of the immune system in vitro, in situ, and in vivo.
b. Host Responses - The study of the immune response to infectious agents, or to diseases driven by the immune system. It deals with the physiological functioning of the immune system in response to bacterial, viral, parasitic or fungal infection; or to inflammatory diseases, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo.

9. Microbiology

a. Bacteriology - The study of prokaryotes, including bacteria and archaea.
b. Environmental Microbiology - The study of the function and diversity of microbes in their natural environments; it includes the study of microbial ecology, microbially mediated nutrient cycling, geomicrobiology, microbial diversity, and bioremediation.
c. Microbial Physiology - The study of the biology and function of microorganisms. It includes but is not limited to information on metabolic pathways, functional genomics, microbial growth, and microbial cell structure.
d. Mycology - The study of fungi, their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy, and their use and dangers to humans.
e. Parasitology - The study of parasitic protozoa and helminthic worms, their hosts, and the relationship between them.
f. Virology - The study of biological viruses and virus-like agents, including their structure and classification, their ways to infect and exploit cells for virus reproduction, the diseases they cause, the techniques to isolate and culture them, and their potential uses in research and therapy.

10. Neuroscience

a. Neurobiology - The study of cells of the nervous system and the organization of the cells into functional circuits that process information and mediate behavior.
b. Neuroscience - The study of the nervous system, including the brain, spinal cord, and neurons, in order to advance the understanding of human thought, emotion, and behavior.
c. Psychobiology - The study of the interrelationship of the mental processes and the anatomy and physiology of the individual or psychology as investigated by biological methods.

11. Physiology and Pharmacology

a. Anatomy - The study of the shape and structure of organisms and their parts. The bodily structure of a plant or an animal or any of its parts.
b. Endocrinology - The study of the glands and hormones of the body and their related disorders.
c. Nutrition - The study of food and nourishment, especially the process by which a living organism assimilates food and uses it for growth and replacement of tissues.
d. Pharmacology - The study of drugs, including their composition, uses, and effects.
e. Physiology - The study of the functions of living organisms and their parts.
f. Toxicology - The study of the adverse effects of chemical, physical, or biological agents on living organisms and the ecosystem, including the prevention and amelioration of such adverse effects.

12. Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health

a. Anthropology - The study of all human beings across times and places and with all dimensions of humanity (evolutionary, biophysical, sociopolitical, economic, cultural, linguistic, psychological, etc.). Medical anthropology examines the ways in which culture and society are organized around or influenced by issues of health, health care, and related issues.
b. Psychology - The study of the mind and behavior. The discipline embraces all aspects of the human experience from the functions of the brain to the actions of nations, and from child development to care for the aged.
c. Public Health and Epidemiology/Biostatistics - Public Health is the study of individuals, communities, activities, and programs to promote health locally and globally, to prevent disease, injury, and premature death, and to assure conditions in which people are safe and healthy. Epidemiology studies the incidence, distribution, and control of diseases and other health related factors. Biostatistics utilizes statistical methods and techniques to examine issues in health-related sciences.
d. Sociology - The study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior.

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Submission & Selection Process

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Submitting Your Abstract Online

Step 1

Click on the Abstract Submission Site. This will take you directly to the submission site. 

Step 2 

Log onto the abstract submission site by entering a login name and password.

If you are a first-time user, you must create a new profile.

If you have submitted an abstract for a previous ABRCMS, use the same login name and password you used previously to access your account. If you have forgotten your login name or password, contact technical support at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (217) 398-1792.

Step 3

On the first submission screen, under "2020 ABRCMS," select either "Submit your ORAL abstract" or "Submit your POSTER abstract." Only one abstract, poster or oral, can be submitted per student.

Please keep in mind that only community college students and undergraduates, who have not previously won a presentation award, are the only ones eligible to submit an oral abstract. They may also submit a poster abstract.

Step 4

Proceed through the following screens:

  • Title
    Acknowledge the affirmation statements and enter your title as instructed. Note that this is the only time you will need to enter your title.
  • Author Block
    Enter all authors associated with the abstract in the following order: presenting student, research mentor, and then additional coauthors. An abstract must contain at least two authors in the author block.
  • Program Director/Advisor
    If applicable, complete this section regarding your program director or mentor. Please note that all postbaccalaureate and master's students are required to complete this section. On Sept. 15 the listed individual will be emailed a form to confirm the education level of postbaccalaureates and master's students (no other education levels will be asked to complete this form). The form must be submitted by Sept. 17.
  • Additional Information
    Complete this section regarding your educational level, research project, and previous participation at ABRCMS.
  • Scientific Discipline
    Select one of the 12 scientific disciplines and a corresponding subdiscipline that best describes the research in your abstract.
  • Abstract
    Enter only your abstract, which should be a short description of your work. The abstract is limited to 2,500 characters, not including spaces. There are two methods of entering an abstract. You may select your previously prepared abstract file and "upload" it to the submission site, or you may enter your text into the area provided. Note that if you copy and paste text, a loss of all special formatting and symbols may occur.
  • Review My Work
    Review your abstract carefully because if accepted, it will appear in the conference materials exactly as you entered it. To make changes, select the appropriate step on the left-hand margin to return to the portion of the submission site that contains the text you want to change. All changes must be made before Sept. 11, 2020.

As each step is completed, click on the "Save and Continue" button to save your work. You will automatically be moved to the next step. You can return to a previous step by selecting that step on the left-hand margin of the submission site.

Step 5

Print a copy of the submission page. This will serve as confirmation of your abstract submission. We cannot honor requests for copies of submitted abstracts. Please note that submission of an abstract does not guarantee acceptance to the conference.

Need help with the submission system? Each page of the submission site has a "help" button that explains the contents of the page. If you are not able to resolve the problem, contact technical support at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 217-398-1792.

 

Selection Process

Abstract Selection: Poster Presentation


Three main criteria will be considered by the review committee when reviewing abstracts for acceptance.

  • A minimum of two authors in the author block (a submission with one author will result in an automatic rejection)
  • Demonstration of a scientific problem (submissions must contain hypothesis and/or statement of problem, methods/methodology used, the results, and a conclusion)
  • Quality of written content

Abstracts must contain the required components and abide by the guidelines in order to be considered for acceptance. 
Tips for submitting a competitive abstract can be found here and by attending the webinar series "Writing a Compelling Abstract."   

Abstract Selection: Oral Presentation

Of the abstracts submitted for oral presentation, only the top 120 oral abstracts will be selected for oral presentations. If an abstract is accepted into the conference, but not selected for oral presentation, that abstract will be automatically assigned to a poster presentation.

All abstracts submitted for oral presentation will first be reviewed for acceptance into the conference using the criteria for poster presentations. If accepted into the conference, the abstract will be reviewed for oral presentation using the following criteria:

  • Originality and innovation
  • Validity of scientific project
  • Approach to problem solving
  • Organization and clarity
  • Conciseness

Tips for submitting a competitive abstract can be found here and by attending the webinar series "Writing a Compelling Abstract."

All review decisions are final. There is no appeals process or opportunity to resubmit once an abstract is rejected.

 

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Components of a Competitive Abstract

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Submitting an Abstract

Use the following as a guide for writing a competitive abstract:

Background:

  • Provide a brief context for the research
  • Indicate why it is important

Hypothesis/Objective:

  • State the goal(s) of the research and the question(s) you are seeking to address with this research

Study Design and Research Methods:

  • Specifically state what study design was used in the research
  • If appropriate, state what population or group(s) were studied
  • Briefly describe the study procedures used to carry out the research
  • Indicate which measurement techniques were used in the research
  • Provide information on the data analytic technique(s) that were used

Results: 

  • Briefly describe the main findings or results of your research

Conclusions:

  • Concisely state what the results mean and their impact on the field of research

ABRCMS Online hosts a two part series on how to prepare an abstract:

June 18 & 19
Writing a Compelling Abstract

July 31 & Aug. 5
Communicating Your Science: Preparing the ABRCMS Abstract

 

Resources on Writing Competitive Abstracts

Sample Abstracts in Scientific Disciplines

Click on each discipline to see a sample annotated abstract:

Sample Abstracts 2018 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Cancer Biology Cancer Biology
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Cell Biology Cell Biology
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Chemistry Chemistry
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Computational and Systems Biology Computational and Systems Biology
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Developmental Biology and Genetics Developmental Biology and Genetics
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Engineering Physics and Mathematics Engineering, Physics and Mathematics
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Immunology Immunology
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Microbiology Microbiology
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Neuroscience Neuroscience
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Physiology Physiology and Toxicology
 Sample Abstracts 2018 Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health


The TOP 5 Tips for Writing Your ABRCMS Abstract

This list of tips has been compiled from our webinar series, "Writing a Compelling Abstract". Please view the webinars to get valuable information about writing your abstract for ABRCMS.

1. READ the instructions! Don’t waste energy doing the wrong thing. Familiarize yourself with the requirements for the ABRCMS Abstract submission process.

2. Understand who is the TARGET AUDIENCE (or who you want to be your audience). This not a specialized journal that knows all of your jargon, so know that going in.

3. Write your hypothesis/statement of purpose with CLARITY. An abstract allows the reader to learn a great deal about your work with very little effort. Even though every project won't have a hypothesis, you should always clearly indicate the intended purpose of your work.

4. Make sure the results and conclusions TIE BACK to what you said in your hypothesis/statement of purpose. Think back to what you said the hypothesis/statement of purpose was. If your results and conclusions don't clearly support that, then you haven't done a good job showing reviewers that you are worthy to be selected.

5. Give the abstract to multiple people (including your PI) to REVIEW it. We can't stress the importance of proofreading and review. The more eyes it sees, the better it will be!

Webinars

Articles

Books

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Presentation Guidelines

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Best Practices for Poster and Oral Presentations

Follow these guidelines to have a successful presentation experience. In addition, be sure attend our live ABRCMS Online webinars on Data Preparation and Presentation and Presenting Your Data at a Scientific Conference. Recordings will be available.

Previous ABRCMS presentation awardees will only be assigned one judge and are not eligible for awards. Master's students will not be assigned judges and are ineligible to receive awards.  

Guidelines for Poster Presentations

The poster is the focus of your presentation. In order to eliminate distractions, with exception of the university logo & program/sponsor logos, non-scientific images are not allowed. In addition, no computers or other aids can be used. The only items allowed to be adhered to the poster board itself are the poster and the poster number. Failure to abide by this policy will disqualify the presenter from receiving a presentation award.

Designing your poster
  • The poster board provided is approximately 4' high X 8' wide. Your poster presentation must fit within 4' high X 8' wide. Most posters range from 36'' to 96'' in length X 24'' to 48'' in width
  • Lay your poster sections in a logical order so that other scientists can follow your presentation. A good method is setting up your poster in a column format so that individuals interested can read your poster, 1st vertical, then top to bottom, and then left to right
  • Use a type size that can be read easily from a considerable distance (4 feet or more). Try using a type between 14 – 20 pt. The title should be larger than the rest of the text. Select a legible font such as Times Roman, Times New Roman, Baskerville or Palatino
  • Space your information proportionally: divide your poster either horizontally or vertically into three or four sections, and place your materials within those spaces. Like a layout of a magazine
  • Posters should stimulate discussion, not give a long presentation. Therefore, keep text to a minimum, emphasize graphics, and make sure every item in your poster is necessary
  • When choosing a background, remember that neutral or gray colors will be easier on the eyes than a bright color. In addition, color photos look best when mounted on gray

Preparing for the conference
  • Hand carry your poster to the meeting, using tubular packaging or a portfolio case. Do not mail your poster to the conference headquarters or to the meeting site
  • Come prepared with any relevant handouts you may wish to share and business cards to hand out
  • Be sure to bring pushpins, thumbtacks or velcro to mount your poster. They will not be provided to you at the conference

Presenting your poster
  • No computers or extra aids may be used during a poster presentation
  • Keep your poster presentation to about 5-8 minutes per visitor/judge and allow an additional 5 minutes for questions and answers
  • Try not to stand directly in front of your poster, allow other scientists to view the entire poster. Stand to the side

Guidelines for Oral Presentations

Preparing your PowerPoint
  • All PowerPoint presentations must have 16:9 dimensions (full aspect ratio). To ensure your PowerPoint presentation has the correct dimensions, open PowerPoint and click on the "Design" tab. Then select "Slides Sized" and select "Widescreen (16:9)."  
  • Sans serif type is typically more clean and legible (Arial or Geneva)
  • Upper and lower case lettering is more legible than all capital letters
  • Graphics you project on the screen to support the spoken word should help clarify ideas, emphasize key points, show relationships, and provide the visual information your audience needs to understand your message
  • Make sure the type is large enough to see in the size room you will use (room used at ABRCMS seats about 100)
  • Simple graphs, charts and diagrams are much more meaningful to an audience than complex, cluttered ones. Keep visuals CLEAR and SIMPLE
  • Use a minimum of words for text and title frames. Five to eight lines per frame and five to seven words per line are the maximum - less is better
  • Vary the size of lettering to emphasize headings and subheadings - but avoid using more than three font sizes per frame
  • Try to maintain the same or similar type size from frame to frame - even if some frames have less information
  • Each frame or slide should have a title
  • Title of any data slide should be the conclusion reached from the presented material
  • Use the format that matches the material you are presenting. Use a table for exact values, a graph to show relationships, a figure for a picture, and a chart for a process or sequence. Label everything
  • Keep color scheme consistent throughout your presentation. Changing colors and type styles can be very confusing and distract from your message
  • Most effective background colors - blue, turquoise, purple, magenta. A good rule of thumb: use a dark background color with lighter color for text and graphics. Avoid intensely bright or saturated colors that compete with the text. You can never go wrong with black on white or white or yellow on dark blue
  • The background should be just a background. It shouldn't call attention to itself or cause clutter or confusion…it should enhance the foreground data
  • In addition to the use of graphics, photographs can provide an excellent means for communication

Giving your talk
  • All ABRCMS oral presentations will be given 10 minutes for the presentation and 5 minutes for questions and answers. Laser pointers will not be available, you must bring your own if you would like to use one
  • Check each slide in a similar room with similar equipment before your presentation (ABRCMS rooms will be equipped with a computer and LCD project)
  • Practice, practice, practice
  • Prepare for questions and answers
  • When asked a question during your presentation, repeat the question so that the entire audience knows what the question is
  • Keep to the allotted time

 ABRCMS presenters are encouraged to make sure their presentation is accessible to all. Below are a few resources on how to use Universal Design to achieve this:

 

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Call for Abstracts

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ABRCMS 2020 Response to COVID-19

ABRCMS recognizes the significant challenges COVID-19 has placed on the scientific and educational communities. In response, ABRCMS has implemented the following:

ABRCMS 2020 ePoster Presentation Session incorporated with ABRCMS Online will be held December 2-4, 2020
- In an effort to provide students who are unable to participate in-person at ABRCMS 2020 with an opportunity to present their research, an ePoster Presentation Session will be held on December 2-4, 2020

Due to the financial hardships caused by COVID-19, in 2020 registration for the ePoster Presentation Session will be
free.

In-person Presentation Sessions at ABRCMS 2020 on November 11-14 in San Antonio, TX
-In addition to students submitting an abstract based on current research, ABRCMS is allowing students to submit an abstract based on past research or virtual research experiences
- Abstract submissions from past ABRCMS will NOT be accepted
- Permission must be obtained from the lab where the research was conducted

Apply Here

Take Note of Important Dates

June 18 & 19: Writing a Compelling Abstract webinar
July 31 & Aug. 5: Data Preparation and Presentation webinar
Aug. 20: Student Travel Award Deadline
Sept. 11: Abstract Submission Deadline
Sept. 17-20: Abstract Review
Sept. 28: Abstract Notifications Sent
Sept. 30: Accept/Withdraw Abstract Deadline
Oct. 2: Presenting Your Data at a Scientific Conference webinar
Nov. 11–14: ABRCMS 2020

1. Confirm your eligibility.

To submit an abstract, you must satisfy the following two criteria:

  1. As of Nov. 11, 2020, you must be currently enrolled as one of the following:
    • Community college student
      • Must have completed at least 30 credit hours
    • Undergraduate sophomore, junior, or senior
    • Postbaccalaureate student
      • Must be enrolled in a formalized program
      • Program Director/Research Advisor must submit confirmation of education level*
    • Terminal level master's student
      • Program Director/Research Advisor must submit confirmation of education level*

  2. Have conducted research, used experimental methods and developed results in one of the 12 ABRCMS scientific disciplines

Important Information

  • Only undergraduate students, including community college students, are eligible to submit an abstract for oral presentations. Undergraduate and community college students also have the opportunity to submit poster abstracts 
  • Postbaccalaureate, master's students and previous poster/oral presentation awardees are only eligible to submit abstracts for poster presentations
  • Your eligibility is based on your enrolled education level as of Nov. 11, 2020 and NOT your education level when you conducted your research or when you submitted your abstract
  • Doctoral level graduate students, including individuals enrolled in professional degree programs (i.e. DVM, PharmD, DMD), are ineligible to present

    *On Sept.
    15 all postbaccalaureate and master's students' program directors or advisors will be sent an email containing a form to complete and a link to upload the form. The form will serve as confirmation of the student's education level. All forms must be submitted by Sept. 17. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that all components were received.

Award Eligibility

  • Previous ABRCMS presentation awardees will have their poster presentations judged by one individual on-site and will not be eligible for awards
  • Master's student presentations will not be judged on-site and are not eligible for awards

2. Review the abstract components and guidelines.

Accepted abstracts must contain:

  1. At least two authors in the author block
  2. Hypothesis or statement about the problem under investigation
  3. Statement of the experimental methods/methodology used
  4. Essential results provided in summary form (even if preliminary)
  5. Conclusion

Abstracts missing any of the items above will be rejected. In addition, abstracts must be clearly written and free of multiple errors.

Learn how to write a competitive abstract.

Abstract Rules:

  • Only one student, the individual listed first in the author block, can present the abstract
  • You must obtain permission from your research mentors, co-authors, and program directors before submitting an abstract. Research mentors, co-authors, and program directors will receive a copy of the notification e-mail by Sept. 28, 2020 indicating the status of the abstract
  • Only one abstract submission, poster or oral, per student is acceptable. You must decide between submitting an abstract for poster OR oral presentation. If you are listed as the presenting author on more than one abstract, all abstracts associated with you will be automatically rejected
  • If you are working in the same lab as another abstract submitter, you must independently submit original abstracts. Identical abstracts submitted by different students will be automatically rejected
  • Abstracts must be written by you and reviewed/edited by the mentor. Mentors should not write the abstract
  • Citations, tables and keywords are not allowed in the abstract text and will be removed
  • The character limit of the abstract is 2,500 (not including spaces)
  • Work must be proofread prior to submission. ABRCMS staff will not edit abstracts nor add co-authors after the abstract submission deadline
  • No late submissions will be accepted

Additional Resources:

3. See if you're eligible for an ABRCMS Student Travel Award.

If you are a first-time ABRCMS presenter, check to see if you are eligible for a travel award. Applications are due by Aug. 20, 2020Please note master's students are ineligible to apply.

4. Attend the "Writing a Compelling Abstract" webinar series.

Understand how ABRCMS reviewers will review your abstract and the elements of successful abstract submissions when you attend this ABRCMS Online series.

June 18 & 19
Writing a Compelling Abstract

July 31 & Aug. 5
Preparing the ABRCMS Abstract: Communicating Your Science

All abstract submitters are strongly encouraged to attend one of these sessions.

5.  Submit your abstract by 11:59 pm PDT Sept. 11, 2020.

Submit your abstract via the ABRCMS Abstract Portal. For details on using the site and how abstracts are selected, click here.

6. You will be notified by Sept. 28, 2020 if your abstract is accepted.

All abstract authors, including the research advisor listed on your abstract, will receive notice of whether or not your abstract was accepted.

7. If your abstract is accepted, confirm status by Sept. 30, 2020. 

You MUST accept the invitation to present your abstract by Sept. 30 in order to participate in the judging program. Presentation date/time will not be provided until you have accepted.

Please note that ABRCMS has a strict No Show Policy. If you accept to present, but do not show up you will be excluded from having your presentation judged the next time you attend ABRCMS.

8. Register for the conference.

All accepted presenters who wish to attend the conference must register and pay the registration fee. Additional information can be found here.

9. Review the presentation policies and guidelines.

Follow these guidelines to prepare for a successful ABRCMS poster/oral presentation. In addition, be sure to review the rubric that the judges will be using to evaluate your presentation.

Poster Policy: The poster is the focus of your presentation. In order to eliminate distractions, with exception of the university logo & program/sponsor logos, non-scientific images are not allowed. In addition, no computers or other aids can be used.

The only items allowed to be adhered to the poster board itself are the poster and the poster number. Failure to abide by this policy will disqualify the presenter from receiving a presentation award.

ABRCMS Online provides two webinars to help you prepare to present:

Sept. 18
Data Preparation and Presentation

Oct. 2
Presenting Your Data at a Scientific Conference

10. Attend the webinar "Scientific Conference Preparation: Gearing Up for ABRCMS".

This webinar is highly recommended for first-time academic conference attendees and orients seasoned conference attendees to the ABRCMS experience. Dates for the webinar are:

  • October 20, 2020 | 6-7 p.m. ET
  • October 22, 2020 | 3-4 p.m. ET
  • October 23, 2020 | 12-1 p.m. ET

Visit the Gearing Up for ABRCMS webpage to sign up and get more information.

11. View all 2020 abstracts on ABRCMS mobile app.

The 2020 abstracts will be available via the mobile app.

To view the 2019 ABRCMS Abstracts, click here.

12. Present your research at ABRCMS 2020!

Guest Pass
Guest passes are available on-site at Meeting Services located next to registration. Guest passes only allow access to the student's presentation for a specific day and time. No access to sessions, meals, exhibits, nor the awards banquet is permitted with a guest pass. If a guest would like to attend multiple days, a paid registration will be required. Tickets are available for guests to purchase tickets to the Awards Banquet.
 
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Call for Session Proposals

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The call for session proposals for ABRCMS 2020 is now closed. 

ABRCMS conference and programmatic goals are to 1) encourage undergraduates to pursue advanced training and careers in the biomedical and behavioral sciences, 2), provide faculty mentors, advisors, and program leaders with resources for facilitating student success, 3) engage, educate, inspire, and broaden participation in STEM education and careers to an interdisciplinary audience, 4) provide a forum to explore the diverse spectrum of STEM research and connect attendees with experts in the field, and 5) articulate the importance of the research to a diverse audience.

ABRCMS programming is a compilation of committee-generated topics, solicited proposals, and attendee feedback. Diversity among the session leaders, panelists, topics, and varied perspectives are strongly favored, as this will ensure a stronger program. ABRCMS seeks to provide a balanced program that provides opportunities to engage in meaningful conversations that feature diverse speakers on a wide range of topics. Innovative sessions are strongly encouraged.

Note: Individuals who submit proposals that specifically promote organizations or institutions will not be considered through the regular proposal process, but instead will be referred to the ABRCMS Exhibits Programs to purchase a booth.

All session proposals must be submitted via the online portal, which is currently open.
Check out the accepted sessions in the latest ABRCMS Final Program.

Scientific Session Proposals

ABRCMS is soliciting cutting-edge scientific research proposals for innovative and engaging STEM talks to inspire the next generation of scientists. ABRCMS is comprised of 12 STEM disciplines and encourages multidisciplinary research to make transformative discoveries. 

Session Type

  • Expert Lecture Format (30 minutes): This lecture will be conducted by an individual expert in a specific field, who has a breadth of knowledge to share conceptual innovations on emerging scientific concepts. (Session will be limited to 25 minutes with 5 minutes for Q&A.) 

Requirements

The following information will be required in your proposal:

  • Session title (should be short and catchy to draw a crowd)
  • Description, to include up to three learning objectives (150 words or less) 
  • Scientific discipline
  • Speaker(s)
  • Speaker diversity
  • Speaker bio (150 words or less)
  • Speaker photo
  • Funding request

Review Criteria

Scientific session proposals will be rated on the following components:

  1. Significance and overall impact
    Topic should focus on one or more of the 12 scientific disciplines. Areas of unique research topics include are highly encouraged. 

  2. Audience
    Topic should be appealing to all ABRCMS attendee types. 

  3. Speakers
    Speakers should have expertise in the content area.

All session proposals will be reviewed by a Committee to ensure that they clearly articulate the goals, benefits, and outcomes of the session to attendees. Please note that poorly written proposals will be rejected.

How will my session be funded? 

There are (2) available options to select from during the submission process, which are as follows: 

  1. The speaker/speaker's institution will cover all expenses (e.g. registration, travel, and housing) directly. Please note that ABRCMS will not be responsible for covering any expenses. 

  2. The speaker requests ABRCMS to cover partial or full expenses for one speaker only If the session requires more than one speaker, it will be the responsibility of the speaker or institution/organization to incur the cost of all additional speakers.

Notations

  • Expenses consist of registration, housing and/or airfare, not ground transportation or meals outside of the conference.
  • While international session proposals are strongly encouraged, due to federal funding, ABRCMS is unable to support travel for international speakers.

May I submit more than one proposal? 

Yes. You may submit more than one proposal, but there must be an individual submission for each proposal. Speakers of diverse backgrounds and institutions are strongly recommended. Each submission will be reviewed independently and all the fields must be completed in each proposal.

Submit a Session Proposal

Have an idea for a session that you would like featured at the 2020 ABRCMS Conference in San Antonio, TX? Follow the instructions below:   

  • Click here to begin your session proposal submission.
  • Follow the instructions to generate a log-in account.
  • Step 1: Click "Start Here" to create a profile. (Note: It is critical that you indicate your "educational/professional" status in this step, as it will populate all programs that you are eligible to submit).
  • Step 2: Select 2020 ABRCMS (Scientific) Session Proposal Submission Site in the dropdown and click Continue.
  • Step 3: Proceed to complete the required fields in the submission portal.
  • Questions? Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

NOTE: Only complete submissions will be considered by the Review Panel.

Deadline to submit is May 15.

Contact Us

Tiffani Fonseca
202-942-9283
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Professional Development Session Proposals

ABRCMS is soliciting Professional Development proposals to encourage undergraduates to pursue advanced training and careers in the biomedical and behavioral sciences and to promote professional and skillset development for students and non-students.

Sessions geared toward trainees must focus on advancing trainees' educational and career development. Sessions geared toward non-students must focus on facilitating student success or help to advance attendees' career growth. Professional development sessions can be geared toward a general audience or specific groups, including:

  • Community college and nontraditional students
  • Undergraduate and postbaccalaureate students
  • Graduate students and postdoctoral scientists
  • Faculty, program directors, and exhibitors

All professional development sessions must add to the ongoing discussions of the larger conference themes and goals. Attendees should have actionable takeaways that will further their career development and skillset.

Due to the limited slots available, the ABRCMS programming team may contact a few session leads to integrate their session with other speakers, who have similar topics. Also, sessions that are not accepted for a face-to-face presentation at the 2020 ABRCMS conference may be recommended for a webinar presentation.

Session Types

  • Expert Lecture Format (45 minutes): Lecture will be conducted by up to two experts in a specific field, who have a breadth of knowledge to share conceptual innovations on trending professional development topics. (Session will be limited to 35 minutes with 10 minutes for Q&A.)

  • Interactive/Skill-Building Session Format (1 hour): Session allows the speaker(s) to engage the audience in an invigorating discussion through active demonstrations such as role-playing, break-out groups, and/or strategic games to increase the audiences’ conceptual knowledge on the content presented and how to employ such techniques and strategies, as they matriculate in the STEM field. (Session will be limited to 50 minutes with 10 minutes for Q&A).

  • Panel Discussion Format (1 hour): Discussion is designed for panelists to share their viewpoints and experiences on trending topics and to cultivate the audiences’ awareness of inclusive subject matters. (Session will be limited to 50 minutes with 10 minutes for Q&A.)

  • Workshop Format (up to 4 hours): Workshop allows facilitators to engage the audience through break-out groups to increase their knowledge through case-based learning and how to employ such methodologies and strategies in the field of STEM. (Workshops may proceed up to 4 hours, which will be up to the discretion of the ABRCMS programming team.)

Suggested Session Topics

Innovative topics and ideas are encouraged. Below is a list of suggested topics to address in your proposal, but not limited to: 

  • Career pathways (i.e. industry, science policy, entrepreneurship, research, government, and etc.)
  • Curriculum development (i.e. innovative pedagogy, CURE, SEA-PHAGES)
  • Diversity, inclusion, and equity (i.e. overcoming imposter syndrome, strategies for increasing diversity in higher education, disabilities, neurodiversity, and etc.)
  • Enhancing skills (i.e. job search strategies, time management, and etc.)
  • Evaluation and assessment (i.e. best practices, tools for evaluating program effectiveness, and etc.)
  • Graduate school preparation (i.e. finding funding, preparing personal statements, interviewing, graduate school experience, work-school-life balance, and etc.)
  • Mentoring (i.e. utilizing mentoring as a personal development strategy, navigating mentoring relationships, selecting a good mentor, and etc.)
  • Social constructivism (i.e. scientific learning influenced by social constraints, processes of belief structures, and etc.)
  • Teaching strategies (i.e. creating an inclusive classroom, evidence-based teaching, case-based learning, and etc.)
  • Other (i.e. ethics, applying for grants, and etc.)

Requirements

The following information will be required in your proposal:

  • Session type
  • Session title (should be short and catchy to draw a crowd)
  • Description, to include up to three Learning objectives (150 words or less)
  • Targeted audience
  • Speaker(s)
  • Speaker diversity
  • Speaker bio (150 words or less)
  • Speaker photo
  • Funding request

Review Criteria

Professional development session proposals will be rated on the following components:

  1. Significance and overall impact
    • The proposal should contribute to one or more of ABRCMS goals: (i) encourage students toward graduate or professional education, training, and research careers, (ii) provide resources for faculty, researchers, and program directors to help them succeed as scientists, advisers, educators, and leaders, (iii) prepare students for the evolving and interdisciplinary nature of STEM research and careers, and (iv) provide resources to help underrepresented minorities succeed in STEM.

  2. Audience
    • Professional development sessions should target the following audiences:
      • Community college and nontraditional students
      • Undergraduate and postbaccalaureate students
      • Graduate students and postdoctoral scientists
      • Faculty, program directors, and exhibitors

  3. Speakers
    • Speakers should have expertise in the content area they are presenting on. Speakers from diverse background and experience are highly encouraged.

All session proposals will be reviewed by a Committee to ensure that they clearly articulate the goals, benefits, and outcomes of the session to attendees. Please note poorly written proposals will be rejected.

How will my session be funded?

There are (2) available options to select from during the submission process, which are as follows:

  1. The speaker/speaker's institution will cover all expenses (e.g. registration, travel, and housing) directly. Please note that ABRCMS will not be responsible for covering any expenses.

  2. The speaker requests ABRCMS to cover partial or full expenses for one speaker only. If the session requires more than one speaker, it will be the responsibility of the speaker or institution/organization to incur the cost of all additional speakers.

Notations

  • Expenses consist of registration, housing and/or airfare, not ground transportation or meals outside of the conference.
  • While international session proposals are strongly encouraged, due to federal funding, ABRCMS is unable to support travel for international speakers.

May I submit more than one proposal?

Yes. You may submit more than one proposal, but there must be an individual submission for each proposal. Diverse backgrounds speakers and institutions are strongly recommended. Each submission will be reviewed independently and all the fields must complete in each proposal.

Submit a Session Proposal

Have an idea for a session that you would like featured at the 2020 ABRCMS Conference in San Antonio, TX? Follow the instructions below:

  • Click here to begin your session proposal submission.
  • Follow the instructions to generate a log-in account.
  • Step 1: Click “Start Here” to create a profile.
  • (Note: It is critical that you indicate your “educational/ professional” status in this step, as it will populate all programs that you are eligible to submit).
  • Step 2: Select 2020 ABRCMS (Professional Development) Session Proposal Submission Site in the dropdown and click Continue.
  • Step 3: Proceed to complete the requirements in the submission
  • Questions? Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Note: Only complete submissions will be considered by the Review Panel.
Deadline to submit is May 15.

Contact Us

Tiffani Fonseca, Education Specialist
202-942-9283
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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